Taming the .45-70

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Nathan
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Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Thu Aug 30, 2018 9:45 am

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I got the opportunity to fire my new tractor gun (Marlin 1895GBL) and I'll get into that experience next. First I want to state that I fell in love with this rifle the moment my hand touched it. The fit, finish and overall craftsmanship are what I would expect in a rifle made by hand before the assembly line came along. It's absolutely wonderful to hold and to look at. But then, sooner or later, you gotta shoulder this rifle and shoot it and that's where the problem comes in. I'm not new to shooting or shooting big bores and I've owned and fired .45-70s in the past. But (and this is a big but), I'm getting older (I'm 49) and I find no pleasure in excessive recoil anymore.
My first mistake in shooting my new rifle was my optimism in loading a full magazine (325 grain LeverRevolution). I leveled off for the first shot at a cattle mineral block around 100 yards away and then I pulled the trigger. The good news is, I absolutely destroyed the mineral block. The bad news? I had to pick up my shoulder off the ground. The first shot showed me that the rifle is well sighted in already, and that's why I have no excuse for why I couldn't have hit the side of a barn at 10 yards with the following two shots. It was clear to me that I was anticipating recoil and am essentially afraid to fire my new rifle (as is). I absolutely do not regret the purchase, but I have to do something to tame the recoil or I'll never want to fire my beautiful rifle. My previous .45-70 did not recoil this excessively, but that rifle was much heavier than this one, and I was also 25 years younger than I am today. But I love this rifle and I want to enjoy shooting it.
It already has what feels to be a very nice recoil pad on the stock, but I'm going to order a Limbsaver and see if that makes much real world difference. I also want to add weight to this rifle and am seeking advice on how to best go about that. I thought about perhaps while the recoil pad is off, drilling into the back of the stock and filling it with lead. I don't want to hand load lighter loads or I might as well just carry .44 Magnum. What say you?
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby 11bravo » Fri Aug 31, 2018 6:57 am

I don’t think filling the stock would be a great idea as that would throw the balance of the rifle off. Especially for you Nate. We know this will be a working rifle not a safe queen, so I think the balance will be very important.

I’m facing the same issues as my rheumatoid arthritis get worse even smaller calibers like the 308 start to get to me after 20 rounds or so I’m done. It sucks though as I am only 32. If you find something that helps please share as I find myself just shooting smaller rounds like the 243 more and more.

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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby yankeejib » Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:04 am

Gun porn doesn't really do much for me anymore, but THAT PICTURE!
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby samuelrp » Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:23 pm

Nathan wrote:Image

First I want to state that I fell in love with this rifle the moment my hand touched it. What say you?


Nathan you say that about all your guns! Like children, you love them all, :D . The design of the stock on a lever action may increase recoil? Easiest help I'm sure is a more giving recoil pad. Different ammo ( heavy grain Remington ) may help and still provide accuracy.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:09 am

11bravo wrote:I find myself just shooting smaller rounds like the 243 more and more.

I'm in a similar situation. To make the .45-70 even more brutal, I'm having a rotator cuff issue again. I had the surgery twenty five years ago and they don't think operating again is the best option. They want to give me the injections but they only last a week to ten days which would leave me going to the doctor at least three times a month. Some days I can't use my right arm at all and I'm not yet sure what to do about it. So more often than not I'm left playing through the pain and while shouldering a rifle really has nothing to do with the rotator cuff, having a mule kick to the same shoulder does. Even .30-30 starts to become uncomfortable for me after twenty rounds or so. I ran a box through my .44 Magnum Winchester and didn't quite make it through a full box. .30-06 is my favorite caliber but can't take more than a dozen or so shots. I do plan to take some time off this winter in hopes of rehabilitating my rotator cuff, but in the meantime most of my shooting is smaller calibers. I even found myself pricing out .44 Special loads for my Winchester.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:15 am

yankeejib wrote:Gun porn doesn't really do much for me anymore, but THAT PICTURE!

Thanks much!

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I'm really looking forward to this Henry in .44 Magnum. I greatly prefer a loading gate to the tube magazine, but when I saw the case hardening work I had to make an exception. I don't have it in yet but found the only one in the country at a distributor last week and expect it Friday. The 16.5" barrel is a little shorter than I'd like but I wanted something I could pull from the scabbard while seated on the tractor.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:17 am

samuelrp wrote:Easiest help I'm sure is a more giving recoil pad. Different ammo ( heavy grain Remington ) may help and still provide accuracy.


I'm ordering a LimbSaver for it and will start there. I don't expect to neutralize it. I mean, it's a huge cartridge. But if I could tone it down a little where I can stand even five shots I'd be able to practice a little with it. As is, after three shots I'm done and when I say done I don't mean I can put it away and pick up the .44 or .30-30 to continue shooting. I mean I'm done shooting for a couple days and that just makes me sad.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby 11bravo » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:44 am

Nathan wrote:
11bravo wrote:I find myself just shooting smaller rounds like the 243 more and more.

I'm in a similar situation. To make the .45-70 even more brutal, I'm having a rotator cuff issue again. I had the surgery twenty five years ago and they don't think operating again is the best option. They want to give me the injections but they only last a week to ten days which would leave me going to the doctor at least three times a month. Some days I can't use my right arm at all and I'm not yet sure what to do about it. So more often than not I'm left playing through the pain and while shouldering a rifle really has nothing to do with the rotator cuff, having a mule kick to the same shoulder does. Even .30-30 starts to become uncomfortable for me after twenty rounds or so. I ran a box through my .44 Magnum Winchester and didn't quite make it through a full box. .30-06 is my favorite caliber but can't take more than a dozen or so shots. I do plan to take some time off this winter in hopes of rehabilitating my rotator cuff, but in the meantime most of my shooting is smaller calibers. I even found myself pricing out .44 Special loads for my Winchester.


What type of injections? Prednisone or cortisone? If one of those find a new doctor. You should only get those twice a year at most. That’s one of the reasons my knees got so bad so fast. Before going to Afghanistan I was getting prednisone injections once a month trying to delay surgery, and still had to have it done before deploying. IMO surgery should be your last option. Every time I’ve had knee surgery I was always a little weaker afterwards and that never came back. I’d look for some physical thearpy options before going under.

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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:19 pm

Cortisone and yeah they also warned me about too many injections. But when I get an injection it doesn't even last two weeks before it hurts again. That was the entire problem was that they don't last long enough to make it worth the trouble.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby 11bravo » Tue Sep 04, 2018 2:41 pm

Nathan wrote:Cortisone and yeah they also warned me about too many injections. But when I get an injection it doesn't even last two weeks before it hurts again. That was the entire problem was that they don't last long enough to make it worth the trouble.

I’ve got some bad news then. They are going to give you 3 choices; surgery, more injections, or opaties.

I chose opaties, not recommending it but it was the best of the avalible options. I hear that majiunana stuff helps people with chronic pain to relax enough to be able to sleep. That was my issue, hurting so bad I couldn’t sleep, That’s just what I heard. :wink:

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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Nathan » Tue Sep 04, 2018 3:35 pm

They used to give me opiates for it and they made a night and day difference, but since the crackdown they don't want to prescribe them anymore. To get them now I feel like I have to beg so I don't even bother. I've heard the same though in regards to herbal treatments, and that's where I'll leave that. ;)
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby 11bravo » Tue Sep 04, 2018 4:29 pm

Nathan wrote:They used to give me opiates for it and they made a night and day difference, but since the crackdown they don't want to prescribe them anymore. To get them now I feel like I have to beg so I don't even bother. I've heard the same though in regards to herbal treatments, and that's where I'll leave that. ;)


I get treated like a junky once a month just for norcos, not anything strong like oxy, so I don’t blame you one bit. Herbal treatments work wonders, so I’ve heard...

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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby Hand and Steel » Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:04 pm

11bravo wrote:IMO surgery should be your last option. Every time I’ve had knee surgery I was always a little weaker afterwards and that never came back. I’d look for some physical thearpy options before going under.


Seconded.

Nate, check to see if there are any good chiropractors and naturapaths in your area. I don't put any stock in fairy dust, but a lot can be done without scalpels and medication if you're willing to pursue other paths of medicine.
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Re: Taming the .45-70

Postby hkguy » Thu Sep 06, 2018 7:40 pm

you could also look at magnaporting the barrel to help alleviate some of the recoil
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